09
Mar
11

PROJECT CROWDSOURCING ENTERS PHASE 2

We’ve received numerous insightful ideas for articles from readers around the world, reaching us through postings here on MEmagazineBlog.org, e-mail, and even old-school letters written on paper. Below is a compilation of readers’ recommendations.

We have examined the suggestions and comments, and have come up with 15 ideas for articles—five each relating to ASME’s strategic initiative areas of energy, engineering workforce development, and global impact. In this second phase of Project Crowdsourcing, we would like you to VOTE FOR THE IDEAS that you believe would make the most interesting topics for articles.

Please rank the ideas—#1 being the most favorable; #5 the least—from each of the three categories. At the end of April, we will tally your votes and post the results.

ENERGY

  1. Compare lifecycle costs and relative merits of leading renewable energy technologies.
  2. Explore U.S. energy independence. How do we formulate a comprehensive plan?
  3. Examine the pros and cons of nuclear fuel reprocessing.
  4. Present an overview of advanced reactor technologies.
  5. Look at the benefits and challenges of advanced vehicles, including the economic and environmental impact of electric vehicles.

ENGINEERING WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

  1. Look at ways to give engineering graduates the necessary practical skills to succeed in tomorrow’s workplace, which may see increasing emphasis on sustainability.
  2. Examine the notion that engineering training in our educational system should begin much earlier than it does right now, and review ways to expose youngsters to various facets of innovation.
  3. Address the importance of removing the growing conception that engineering sciences can be treated as a commodity.
  4. Discuss why the world is becoming increasingly software and computer driven, and report on ways to effectively educate the engineering workforce on computer software and programming.
  5. Explore how contemporary managers and scholars address the multiple dimensions of human behavior and organization.

GLOBAL IMPACT

  1. Discuss how bioengineering and biomedical systems can be geared toward the developing world.
  2. Explore what engineers need to know in order to succeed in the global economy, and discuss global opportunities available to them.
  3. Consider how ASME can provide leadership for improving risk management and resilience for complex systems.
  4. Discuss the reasons why U.S. industry generally has resisted adopting the metric system.
  5. Look at the factors that can maintain job performance and reduce stress when engineers relocate to a new country.

Please click on the LEAVE A COMMENT button above and make your selections!


21 Responses to “PROJECT CROWDSOURCING ENTERS PHASE 2”


  1. 1 Alan E. Belcher
    March 10, 2011 at 10:20 am

    Do I always have to be the first to go? Ah, the freedom of permanent unemployment!
    Kidding apart, here is my vote:

    ENERGY

    3, 1, 4, 5, 2.

    ENGINEERING WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

    1, 3, 2, 4, 5.

    GLOBAL IMPACT

  2. 2 Alan E. Belcher
    March 10, 2011 at 10:27 am

    Truncation problems once again. Time for software upgrade!

    GLOBAL IMPACT

    3, 1, 2, 4, 5.

  3. 3 Eric D. Myracle
    March 14, 2011 at 11:32 am

    Ranking of topics –
    Energy: 1,5,2,3,4
    Engineering Workforce Development: 3,2,1,4,5
    Global Impact: 3,1,2,4,5

    Wherever possible in each topic address the challenge of sustaining a supply of mechanical engineers who are skilled at designing, developing, and maintaining processes and facilities that can manufacture the various devices essential for daily life in our country as well as the rest of the world.

    • March 16, 2011 at 12:54 am

      There are the ugly truths of considering the product life cycle for renewable technologies. Let’s take a holistic approach at defining the life cycle costs vs. relative benefits.

      ENERGY: 1,4,5,2,3

      At least from what I’ve seen, if it’s textbook it can be confused with the properties of common commodities. Yet we continually seek to push the envelope in terms of many areas (efficiencies, strength to weight, etc.) of past endeavors. Does it not seem hubristic in nature that such consideration of bottom lines leads to thought that these practices can be considered a commodity?

      ENGINEERING WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT: 3,2,1,5,4

      It is only right to consider how we can put to use valid solutions to bioengineering and biomedical problems in a developing setting. Come now…conversions are the hallmark of the ME!

      GLOBAL IMPACT: 1,3,2,5,4

  4. March 15, 2011 at 10:01 am

    Energy – 2, 1, 4, 5, 3
    Workforce – 2, 3, 4, 1, 5
    Global – 3, 2, 1, 5, 4

    US Energy Independence with an emphasis on renewables is, I believe, the most important topic and STORAGE is the key.

    At the grid level electrical storage is all important for wind or solar PV – see GE Ecomagination winner http://WWW.SUSTAINX.COM for an isothermal compressed air technology which has the potential for 90%+ efficiency! Also thermal storage with solar parabolic trough technology is a promising approach. STORAGE is the key to leveling the playing field with fossil fuel plants.

    At the distributed level thermal storage is all important see my presentation above: http://WWW.ALTERNATEPICKENSPLAN.COM.

  5. 6 Martin Edelson
    March 25, 2011 at 9:02 pm

    Here are my picks:

    Energy: 1,4,5,3,2
    Nuclear fuel reprocessing has been studied and studied. Enough … it’s not a useful concept in the US.
    Advanced reactor technologies have promise but operators have lots of experience with current nuclear technology and understand it. Learning curves in nuclear industry tend to be expensive and dangerous. Why not stick with what works?

    Engineering workforce development: 2,1,5,4,3
    Tough call between 1 and 2. US education does not expose children to excellence in science, mathematics, and engineering concepts in part because our K-12 teachers are generally not skilled in these concepts. As funding for public education diminishes things are likely to get worse, not better.

    Global impact: 3,1,2,5,4
    US industry opposes regulation of any kind. The metric system? If the government is for it, industry is against it.

  6. 7 Jim Barker
    March 28, 2011 at 10:32 am

    Energy: 2,4,3,1,5
    Engineering workforce: 3,1,2,5,4
    Global impact: 5,2,3,1,4

  7. 8 Greg Kremer
    March 30, 2011 at 3:13 pm

    Energy: 1, 5, 4, 3, 2
    Eng Workforce: 1,5,4,2,3
    Global Impact: 3,1,2,5,4

  8. 9 Matthew Zotter
    April 3, 2011 at 4:59 pm

    Energy:4,3,1(pro/con reprocessing),2,5
    Workforce:1(eng grad),3,5,4,2
    Global:3,2,5,1(metric),4
    ASME should actively promote and use the metric system.

  9. 10 Robert Stojcek
    April 6, 2011 at 2:13 pm

    ENERGY

    4- Lifecycle costs .. renewable energy technologies.
    1- U.S. energy independence.
    5- Nuclear fuel reprocessing.
    2- Advanced reactor technologies.
    3- Impact of electric vehicles.

    ENGINEERING WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

    5- Engineering graduates necessary practical skills.
    1- Engineering training should begin much earlier.
    4- Conception that engineering sciences can be treated as a commodity.
    3- Educate the engineering workforce on computer software and programming.
    2- Multiple dimensions of human behavior and organization.

    GLOBAL IMPACT

    2- Bioengineering geared toward the developing world.
    3- What engineers need to know in order to succeed in the global economy.
    1- ASME provide leadership for improving risk management and resilience for complex systems.
    5- Why U.S. industry generally has resisted adopting the metric system.
    4- Reduce stress when engineers relocate to a new country.

  10. 11 J Stana
    April 10, 2011 at 7:29 am

    Combine 1 and 2 into one story. Focus on energy independance as a critical defense move by the US, not just to reduce global warming. You will never convince some folks that global warming is real based on the past reaction to these type of articles, but if you make it clear that China and India will dominate resources by their very size, the US has to change its energy consumption habits. Include all current options to clean up existing coal and gas plants, reducing consumption by conservation efforts, and the life cycle costs of renewables and what % impact they could have. Think out of the box but apply real economics and show the effect with and without government incentives. You should probably look at other European countries for comparison.

  11. 12 HARRY ARMEN
    April 13, 2011 at 1:00 pm

    i HAVE LISTED MY PREFERENCES (THE FIRST BEING THE HIGHEST) USING THE NUMBERED SEQUENCE OF THE TOPICS IN EACH CATEGORY
    *ENERGY –
    PRIORITY TOPIC
    1 2.Explore U.S. energy independence. How do we formulate a comprehensive plan?
    2 1.Compare lifecycle costs and relative merits of leading renewable energy technologies
    3 3.Examine the pros and cons of nuclear fuel reprocessing.
    4 5.Look at the benefits and challenges of advanced vehicles, including the economic and environmental impact of electric vehicles.
    5 4.Present an overview of advanced reactor technologies.

    *ENGINEERING WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT –
    PRIORITY TOPIC
    1 2.Examine the notion that engineering training in our educational system should begin much earlier than it does right now, and review ways to expose youngsters to various facets of innovation.
    2 1.Look at ways to give engineering graduates the necessary practical skills to succeed in tomorrow’s workplace, which may see increasing emphasis on sustainability.
    3 3.Address the importance of removing the growing conception that engineering sciences can be treated as a commodity.
    4 5.Explore how contemporary managers and scholars address the multiple dimensions of human behavior and organization.
    5 4.Discuss why the world is becoming increasingly software and computer driven, and report on ways to effectively educate the engineering workforce on computer software and programming.

    *GLOBAL IMPACT
    PRIORITY TOPIC
    1 3.Consider how ASME can provide leadership for improving risk management and resilience for complex systems.
    2 1.Discuss how bioengineering and biomedical systems can be geared toward the developing world.
    3 2.Explore what engineers need to know in order to succeed in the global economy, and discuss global opportunities available to them.
    4 4.Discuss the reasons why U.S. industry generally has resisted adopting the metric system.
    5 5.Look at the factors that can maintain job performance and reduce stress when engineers relocate to a new country.

  12. 13 Ron Herman
    April 18, 2011 at 11:03 am

    Energy: 1, 4, 2, 3, 5
    Eng Workforce Dev: 2, 4, 5, 3, 1
    Global Impact: 4, 3, 2, 1, 5

  13. 14 Regis Matzire
    April 20, 2011 at 5:52 pm

    Energy
    Idea #1 – rank 1, but should include all energy technologies not just renewables
    #2 – rank 3
    #3 – rank 4
    #4 – rank 5
    #5 – rank 2, but also include the impact on existing infrastructure to support them
    Engineering Workforce Development
    Idea #1 – rank 2
    #2 – rank 3
    #3 – rank 1
    #4 – rank 4
    #5 – rank 5
    Global Impact
    Idea #1 – rank 3
    #2 – rank 2
    #3 – rank 1 I assume by resilience you mean preventing and mitigating failures
    #4 – rank 4
    #5 – rank 5

  14. 15 Dave Voss
    April 25, 2011 at 1:31 pm

    Energy: 5, 1, 2, 3, 4
    Eng Workforce Dev: 1, 5, 4, 2, 3
    Global Impact: 1, 4, 3, 2, 5

  15. 16 David Kempe PE
    April 25, 2011 at 4:31 pm

    Energy:
    2 The United States will have problems in maintaining its independence if we rely on foreign nations for our energy.
    1
    5
    3
    4

    Engineering Workforce Development:
    1
    2
    3
    5
    4

    I believe our educators are doing the best they can. The problem is industry. I graduated in 1963 and have seen many changes in the engineering profession. Some good and some not so good. I have four sons and a daughter-in-law who are graduate engineers. Engineering was a much better profession when I graduated.

    I contend that 75% of what I know I learned from another engineer, not in school. When manufacturing is sent overseas the engineering knowledge goes with it. Who is going to train the next generation of manufacturing engineers in this country? When engineers leave an employer he takes his knowledge with him. I have known corporations who did not have enough engineers on their staff to properly supervise the consultant designing their projects.

    There is a lack of stability in engineering jobs. This is encouraging some engineers to find another profession and they tend to discourage their children from becoming engineers.
    The treatment of engineers by industry is another issue. Some employers may not be able to find the engineer they need because of the way they treat the engineers they have. This may be a cause as to why some employers of engineers can’t find the engineers they need.

    When my son Mike graduated from Caltech with a PHD in chemical engineering the word was out “engineering jobs aren’t too plentiful so don’t be too fussy”. He checked out one big international company. When he found out how they treat their research engineers he did not apply for a job. He is now well known nationally in his field.

    Global Impact:
    2
    5
    3
    1
    4
    When we export manufacturing and engineering jobs we are exporting the wealth producing segment of our country.

  16. 17 Larry Bailey
    April 28, 2011 at 2:51 pm

    Ranking of topics –
    Energy: 5,1,2,3,4
    Engineering Workforce Development: 3,2,1,4,5
    Global Impact: 4,2,3,5,1

  17. 18 Peter Staats
    May 2, 2011 at 1:42 pm

    I am ranking the energy category as the most important category. The other categories are insignificant in comparison. Among the energy topics my ranking is in the same order as your list: 1,2,3,4,5.
    1. Compare lifecycle costs and relative merits of leading renewable energy technologies.
    These comparisons are only meaningful if they include comparisons to non-renewable technologies.
    2. Explore U.S. energy independence. How do we formulate a comprehensive plan?
    As another reader mentioned, this topic is related to topic 1. The article should examine how renewable energy technologies may or may not play an important role in energy independence.
    3. Examine the pros and cons of nuclear fuel reprocessing.
    It is important to have a realistic risk/benefit analysis.
    4. Present an overview of advanced reactor technologies.
    5. Look at the benefits and challenges of advanced vehicles, including the economic and environmental impact of electric vehicles.
    Any environmental impact analysis should be grounded in reality and not based upon wild climate change speculations. Rather than environmental impact, it would be more interesting to me to see the impact on energy independence (tied to topic 2).

    If any of these topics include carbon capture and sequestration as a “solution”, then an analysis of the technical and economic feasibility of CCS should be included.

  18. 19 Jack Sol-Church
    August 21, 2011 at 2:38 pm

    I was going to start ranking them but decided I couldn’t. The paradigm under which the wording of the topics were created, cannot be sustained and is too limited for the types of discussions that need to occur.
    Examples:
    ENERGY 1. Lifecycle costs – as Regis Matzir and Peter Staats commented, this should be done for ALL energy technologies. The concept should be a first law analysis from start to finish but even a basic $$ analysis would be a start. View energy as an investment. I give you 1 billion KWhs capital with a 1,000 KWh yearly investment. Which energy technology gives the most energy in return and for how long? This should include ALL energy required to find, produce, alter into a useable medium, transportation of that medium, and the mechanism that finally converts the energy to achieve our desired output.
    For each energy source, the scope of the analysis is a huge. Yet, how can we do item #2 (…formulate a comprehensive plan) without understanding the return on investment of each energy technology? This is how we ended up subsidizing ethanol made from corn (ok, it was politics based on…?).
    Nuclear could rise as the energy of the future (ignoring safety) or be left out of the discussion.

    ENERGY 5 ……..advanced vehicles…… This is where WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT 1 & 5 come into play to determine how transportation figures into that population’s lifestyle (NYC vs a rural area). It is a transportation issue working with city planners, then a vehicle issue. The decision will be greatly influenced by ENERGY #1. Does a complete mass transit system make sense? Is it a mix of transportation types; zipcars, smart cars, plugins, trolleys, taxis, busses (different sizes), rickshaws? A diesel car is 30% more efficient but the fuel takes more petroleum and energy to distill, so is it really better?

  19. January 17, 2012 at 2:06 pm

    Dear Memagazineblog,
    Thanks for the above, I’m trying to decide my major in college, and it’s between mechanical engineering and manufacturing engineering. What is the main difference between these two fields, and what type of employment would a person be looking at with each degree?
    Thanks

  20. September 14, 2014 at 11:12 am

    Hi there, yeah this post is really pleasant and I have learned lot of things from it about blogging.
    thanks.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


The Editor

John G. Falcioni is Editor-in-Chief of Mechanical Engineering magazine, the flagship publication of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

March 2011
M T W T F S S
« Feb   Apr »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Twitter from John Falcioni

Twitter from Engineering for Change

Friend us on Facebook

Friend ASME

Friend Engineering for Change

Friend ASME Nanotechnology Institute


%d bloggers like this: