Archive for October, 2010

31
Oct
10

cancer research in florida to begin clinical trials

The Orlando Sentinel reports that a University of Central Florida professor’s breast-cancer research is one step closer to moving from the lab to doctor’s offices.

The University of Central Florida and Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa have signed an agreement with GLG Pharma, a Florida biotechnology firm, to take Dr. James Turkson’s cancer-fighting compound to the next level of development with clinical trials of the compound beginning as soon as next year.

They say that eventually it may be used as a weapon against a variety of cancers, including breast cancer.

31
Oct
10

How much does china matter?

In an online posting, The Economist magazine wonders aloud if China mattes as much as most of us have come to believe. The premise revolves around domestic spending. In a related exchange between the magazine and some some of its readers (click here) the rationale is hugely debated. It makes for interesting reading.

29
Oct
10

a call to improve science and technology education

In a letter published in The New York Times today, ASME Executive Director Thomas G. Loughlin responds to a Times editorial on Oct. 26 by calling on a coalition of public and private sector leaders to step up efforts to support science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education.
“We must address this issue comprehensively if we are to inspire the next generation to take up the engineering profession as an ideal way to help make the world a better place,” Loughlin said. Further, engineering has the potentional to “unlock students’s imaginations and to make their abstract science and math lessons come to life,” he said.

To read the letter, click here http://nyti.ms/cC7aHi.

Visit ASME.ORG to view the Society’s STEM-related activities.
28
Oct
10

Evidence of Subsurface Water in Mars

The ground where NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Spirit became stuck last year holds evidence that water, perhaps as snow melt, trickled into the subsurface fairly recently and on a continuing basis, NASA reports.

Stratified soil layers with different compositions close to the surface led the rover science team to propose that thin films of water may have entered the ground from frost or snow. The seepage could have happened during cyclical climate changes during periods when Mars tilted farther on its axis. The water may have moved down into the sand, carrying soluble minerals deeper than less-soluble ones. Spin-axis tilt varies over timescales of hundreds of thousands of years.

28
Oct
10

mimicking the sun on earth for spacecraft tests

NASA is replicating the power of the sun on Earth—in Alabama—to test how satellites and other hardware will survive in space.

Researchers at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville are using their Solar Thermal Test Facility to simulate some of the harshest conditions of space to find out what extreme temperatures can do to flight hardware close to the sun.

The researchers use a two-story tall curved mirror that beams about 1 million watts per square meter of solar energy intensity into a vacuum chamber at its focal point, where units to be tested are placed.

Researchers have installed a liquid nitrogen shroud on the inside of the vacuum chamber that will allow engineers to chill the vacuum chamber to freezing cold temperatures like those in deep space.

In the front, the mirrors expose the test object to the heat of the sun while in the back the nitrogen exposes it to the coldness of a vacuum.

Together they accurately mimic the conditions of space, allowing scientists to test how their instruments will perform on actual missions close to the sun.

28
Oct
10

Choice not ability keeps women out of math-intensive fields

Two Cornell University psychological researchers conclude that the main factor for a shortage of women in math, science and engineering fields is, clearly, not ability, but rather freely made choices.

They suggest that some women would rather study biology than math. And the reason for a lower number of women than men in these areas of academia is also by choice, given the fact that the difficult first years as a professor coincide with the time when many women are having children.

Psychological scientists Stephen Ceci and Wendy Williams of Cornell University set out to understand the differences between men and women in math-intensive fields such as physics, engineering, computer science, economics, and chemistry. In the top 100 U.S. universities, only 9% to 16% of tenure-track positions in these kinds of fields are held by women.

27
Oct
10

Buckyballs thrive in space

According to NASA, its Spitzer Space Telescope has found little carbon spheres known as Buckyballs throughout our Milky Way galaxy, in the space between stars and around three dying stars.

Spitzer also detected a large number of Buckyballs–the equivalent in mass to about 15 of our moons–around a fourth dying star in a nearby galaxy.

Buckyballs, also known as fullerenes, are soccer-ball-shaped molecules consisting of 60 linked carbon atoms. They are named for their resemblance to the architect Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic domes. Buckyballs inspired the shape of Spaceship Earth, Disney’s Epcot theme park’s giant ride in Orlando, Fla. Disney’s “Buckyball” has become the park’s main icon.

27
Oct
10

CHOOSE HAITI

CHOOSE HAITI is an initiative to create sustainable jobs in Haiti by building demand for Haitian-made products and services.

Since the earthquake in Haiti, earlier this year. 80% of Haiti is unemployed, aid is diminishing, and jobs are needed now.

One of the popular products, the CHOOSE HAITI bracelet, has attracted the support of major US retailers, The Clinton Foundation, and WorldVision. The bracelet is made of 100% recycled material derived from bottles bought in bulk from tent camp residents, sanitized, cut and covered with newspaper paper mache. Read more about this initiative by clicking here.

To visit the CHOOSE HAIT Web site, and see other products, click here.

26
Oct
10

Mems-based natural disaster warning system

IBM has developed a MEMS-based natural disaster warning system using analytics to improve the effectiveness and timeliness of post-event rescue efforts. The technology features a way to predict the location and timing of subsequent catastrophic events.

According to IBM, the system conducts post-event analysis of seismic events, such as earthquakes, and provides early warnings for tsunamis, which can follow earthquakes. It also provides the ability to rapidly measure and analyze the damage zone of an earthquake and thus help prioritize emergency response needed following an earthquake, IBM said.

The warning system uses data generated by vibration sensors (MEMS accelerometers) within computer hard disk drives to analyze and assess information generated by seismic events. This technique works by collecting hard drive sensor data and transmitting it via high-speed networking to a data processing center, which analyzes the data, classifies the events, and enriches the data in real time.

IBM says that the rapid analysis of the data leads to determining exactly when a seismic event started, how long it lasted, its intensity, the frequency of motion of the seismic event, the direction of motion of the seismic event, and other data. This information is then delivered to local, state and federal emergency response officials.

26
Oct
10

husk power system

A short but interesting video shows how entrepreneurs in India are lighting up with bio power.

Husk Power Systems is using an innovative technology mix to run off-grid mini power stations fired by rice husks, a by-product that would otherwise be thrown away and release methane as it rotted. Click here to watch.




The Editor

John G. Falcioni is Editor-in-Chief of Mechanical Engineering magazine, the flagship publication of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

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